Distributing more than 200,000 condoms in the Olympic Village to avoid sexually transmitted diseases

March 30, 2024
Distributing more than 200,000 condoms in the Olympic Village to avoid sexually transmitted diseases

To avoid the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases in the Olympic Village during the Paris Games next summer, more than two hundred thousand male condoms and twenty thousand female condoms are scheduled to be distributed. Athletes will be free to have sex if they want, unlike the last games in Tokyo in the summer of 2021 during the Covid pandemic. About 14,500 athletes and their technical equipment are expected to attend the Olympic Village during the games scheduled between July 26 and August 11.

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More than two hundred thousand male condoms and twenty thousand female condoms will be distributed to prevent sexually transmitted diseases in the Olympic Village during Paris Games next summer.

Although the athletes must focus on their competition, they will be free to have sex if they want, unlike the last games in Tokyo in the summer of 2021 during the Covid pandemic, when officials urged them to “avoid unnecessary physical contact.”

“What we are seeing independently of the Games is an increase in the spread of sexually transmitted diseases among the population,” Laurent Dallard, who is responsible for coordinating first aid and health risks at the Games organizing committee, explained on Tuesday to press reporters.

Flyers and posters will be distributed at the multi-purpose clinic in Olympic Village Located in the suburb of Saint-Denis, to raise awareness among athletes coming from all countries. There will be an HIV testing site within this clinic.

He ordered ten thousand latex-free condoms and twenty thousand oral dams (a square of latex used during oral sex).

About 14,500 athletes and their technical equipment are expected to attend the Olympic Village during the games scheduled between July 26 and August 11.

However, linking the average number of athletes attending and the number of condoms to infer information about sexual relations within the Olympic Village is not logical. A member of the local organizing committee revealed a few months ago to the French Press Agency that some of the products available in the Olympic Village were taken by athletes or their relatives for use after the Games.

The director of research at the National Institute of Health and Medical Research, Dominique Costaliola, stated at the beginning of this March that during competitions, “among the infectious risks, there are those related to sexual health.”

She continued: “We must prepare for the possibility of an increase in emergency cases for prescriptions for post-exposure treatment for HIV, or testing for sexually transmitted diseases. This will affect emergency services.”

A few thousand condoms were distributed for the first time for free at the 1988 Seoul Olympics in South Korea, to encourage safe sex and raise awareness about the then-widespread HIV virus.

The number gradually increased, to 50,000 in Barcelona 1992, 100,000 in Beijing 2008, and 150,000 in London 2012. The 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games were described as the most ferocious, with 450,000 condoms distributed, equivalent to 42 condoms for each athlete.

France 24/AFP

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